The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe

All posts tagged The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe

Beth And Chrissi Do Kid-Lit 2015 – The Round Up

Published December 31, 2015 by bibliobeth

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Hi everyone and welcome to my round up post where Chrissi and I talk about our highlights (and lowlights!) of Kid-Lit 2015. We had some fantastic books on the list this year, please see my reviews below and for Chrissi’s reviews, visit her blog HERE.

JANUARY- Five Children And It- E.Nesbit

FEBRUARY- Pollyanna- Eleanor H.Porter

MARCH- Diary of A Wimpy Kid- Jeff Kinney

APRIL- Flour Babies- Anne Fine 

MAY- The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe- C.S Lewis

JUNE- Velveteen Rabbit- Margery Bianco 

JULY- Gangsta Granny- David Walliams 

AUGUST- The Graveyard Book- Neil Gaiman

SEPTEMBER- Watership Down- Richard Adams

OCTOBER- Goodnight Mister Tom- Michelle Magorian

NOVEMBER- The Class That Went Wild- Ruth Thomas

DECEMBER – The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #1) – Rick Riordan

So, in the style of the “Talking About…” reviews we normally do, we thought we’d answer a quick few questions about our third year of Kid-Lit blogging.

1) What was your favourite Kid-Lit book of 2015 and why?
BETH: SUCH a tough choice. We had some super amazing titles this year. If I absolutely had to choose one it would be Goodnight Mister Tom which narrowly beats The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, one of my all-time favourites. So beautiful. So moving. I may have shed a tear or two…
CHRISSI: It has to be Goodnight Mister Tom which is one of my favourite books of all time, even as an adult it moved me. Possibly more so. Arghhhh the love I have for this book.
2) What was your least favourite Kid-Lit book of 2015 and why?
BETH: Hmm. There weren’t any real howlers this year (compared to the horror that was The Swiss Family Robinson last year!). Again if I had to choose, I would go for Diary Of A Wimpy Kid. This is not because it’s terrible because it’s not at all. Perhaps I was just expecting something a bit more and maybe I’m the wrong demographic but it wasn’t an amazing read for me.
CHRISSI: Watership Down. I’m a massive rabbit lover and wanted to connect with it more.
3) What was the Kid-Lit book of 2015 that surprised you the most?
BETH: Either Watership Down which was slightly darker than I expected or Velveteen Rabbit which was even more adorable than I expected!
CHRISSI: The Lightning Thief. I didn’t expect to enjoy Percy Jackson as much as I did!
4) Have you been inspired to read any other books from a Kid-Lit author of 2015?
BETH: Yes! Something else from Ruth Thomas after once again thoroughly enjoying The Class That Went Wild as an adult and David Walliams as I thought Gangsta Granny was a brilliant read. Wonder if one of these authors will turn up on our list for 2016? &#X1f60a
CHRISSI: More from David Walliams and Rick Riordan!

For anyone who reads these posts, thank you so much for your continued support, we love doing this challenge and hope to continue it indefinitely. Coming tomorrow – the big reveal for Kid-Lit 2016! Which titles made it this year? And which titles are we going to have to do er…. another year?!

Beth and Chrissi do Kid-Lit 2015 – MAY READ – The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

Published May 31, 2015 by bibliobeth

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What’s it all about?:

When Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy took their first steps into the world behind the magic wardrobe, little do they realise what adventures are about to unfold. And as the story of Narnia begins to unfold, so to does a classic tale that has enchanted readers of all ages for over half a century.

What did I think?:

In 2014, Chrissi and I covered the first book in the Narnia series, The Magician’s Nephew (please see my review HERE). We both loved the world of Narnia as children so we thought it only proper that we continue reviewing the series as part of our Kid-Lit challenge. So, in 2015 here comes number two in the order that C.S. Lewis would prefer readers to approach the series, The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe. It was adapted fairly recently into a Hollywood blockbuster film but before that it was adapted for television first in 1967 and again in 1988-90 as part of a successful BBC television series which I vividly recall enjoying. There has even been an animated series in 1979 winning itself an Emmy in the process for Outstanding Animated Program. This was recorded for us by our parents and must have been the most watched video in our household! Finally, it has also been dramatised for BBC Radio 4 and appeared on the stage in the UK, USA, Philippines and Australia.

So if you’ve been living under a rock for a while, here’s what the book is all about. Four siblings Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy are evacuated from London during the war and sent to live in a huge house in the countryside owned by a Professor Kirke (Digory Kirke from The Magician’s Nephew actually) and a disgruntled housekeeper Mrs Macready who does not fancy the idea of four children under her feet. Luckily for her, the children choose to keep out of “the Macready’s” way and during a game of Hide and Seek the youngest child Lucy discovers the magical land of Narnia when she hides in a wardrobe. The first person she meets is a charming Faun called Mr Tumnus who tells Lucy that Narnia is under the terrible spell of The White Witch who makes it always winter and never Christmas and turns any animal who crosses her into stone with a flick of her magic wand. Mr Tumnus also tells her that she has paid him to bring any Daughter of Eve (human girl) or Son of Adam (human boy) to her if he should ever encounter them in the forest. There is an ancient prophecy about four children filling the thrones at Cair Paravel castle which would mean the end of the White Witch’s reign so she has a right to be slightly worried. Of course, Tumnus is a good old faun really and helps Lucy to get home quickly before she can be spotted by any of the Witch’s other spies.

Lucy is excited to tell her sister and brothers all about the fantastical world she has been to but even though it feels as if she has been gone hours only a few seconds of time have passed in “our world,” so her siblings believe she is making it up. It doesn’t help matters when Edmund manages to enter Narnia also and when begged by Lucy to admit that the world exists, he maintains that she is lying which distresses her greatly. Of course the four children manage to enter Narnia eventually but it looks like it isn’t going to be all dancing and sunbeams when they discover poor Mr Tumnus has been taken prisoner by the White Witch for daring to interact with her enemies. To top it all off with a big cherry Edmund has gone over to the dark side with promises of Turkish Delight and king-making from the Witch. All four children are now in grave danger and so is Narnia as without Edmund the prophecy cannot be fulfilled. But the silver lining if you want to see it is that the mysterious and all-powerful Aslan is on the move and he just might be able to save everything.

It was absolutely lovely to read this story again as an adult and I enjoyed it just as much as when I was a child. The beautiful writing of C.S. Lewis brings the world of Narnia alive to the reader with all of its power and danger. He writes so assuredly that you can believe a robin can lead the way, a beaver can use a sewing machine, a bull can have the head of a man and vice versa and a lion can come back from the dead. The White Witch was one of the first villains in literature that I both feared and hated and I even felt myself melting again as Edmund was reconciled with his brother and sisters. I know that a lot of people have poked fun at the Christian allegories – for example, Aslan on the Stone Table and The White Witch aka Satan but even though I am more aware of this as an adult it did not affect my pleasure in reading it at all. When all is said and done, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantastic story that continues to thrill children and adults alike without even considering religion as an issue. I mean, talking animals, a great “baddie,” and some hideous creatures… what more do you need? This for me is an unrivalled children’s classic that I hope people will continue to read for many years to come.

For Chrissi’s fab review, please see her blog HERE.

Would I recommend it?:

But of course!

Star rating (out of 5):

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“ROAR!” from the animated version of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe

http://www.animatedviews.com

narnia bench

The beautiful Narnia book bench which was displayed in London last year (2014)

http://www.booksabouttown.org.uk

Beth and Chrissi do Kid Lit – the titles for 2015

Published January 3, 2015 by bibliobeth

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This is the third year that my sister and fellow blogger Chrissi Reads and myself have set ourselves a Kid-Lit Challenge and this year we decided to shake things up a bit. We have each picked six so-called “classic” works of children’s fiction and we based this around books published before 1980 (yes, it wasn’t so long ago, I know), and six more “modern” children’s stories. We hope you will enjoy our selection.

JANUARY- Five Children And It- E.Nesbit

FEBRUARY- Pollyanna- Eleanor H.Porter

MARCH- Diary of A Wimpy Kid- Jeff Kinney

APRIL- Flour Babies- Anne Fine 

MAY- The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe- C.S Lewis

JUNE- Velveteen Rabbit- Margery Bianco 

JULY- Gangsta Granny- David Walliams 

AUGUST- The Graveyard Book- Neil Gaiman

SEPTEMBER- Watership Down- Richard Adams

OCTOBER- Goodnight Mister Tom- Michelle Magorian

NOVEMBER- The Class That Went Wild- Ruth Thomas

DECEMBER – The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #1) – Rick Riordan

 

The Book of Secrets – Elizabeth Joy Arnold

Published December 7, 2013 by bibliobeth

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What’s it all about?:

After more than twenty years of marriage, Chloe Sinclair comes home one night to find that her husband, Nate, is gone. All he has left behind is a cryptic note explaining that he’s returned to their childhood town, a place Chloe never wants to see again.

While trying to reach Nate, Chloe stumbles upon a notebook tucked inside his antique copy of “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.” Written in code, the pages contain long-buried secrets from their past, and clues to why he went home after all these years. As Chloe struggles to decipher the notebook’s hidden messages, she revisits the seminal moments of their youth: the day she met the enigmatic Sinclair children and the increasingly dangerous games they played to escape their troubled childhoods; the first time Nate kissed her, camped out on the beach like Robinson Crusoe; and the elaborate plan she and Nate devised, inspired by “Romeo and Juliet, ” to break away from his oppressive father. As the reason for Nate’s absence comes to light, the truth will forever shatter everything Chloe knows–about her husband, his family, and herself.

What did I think?:

I came across this novel on NetGalley so many thanks to them and to Bantam Publishers for an advanced readers copy. Reading this book was like sinking into a comfortable sofa with a big mug of tea, a bit of chocolate and a warm duvet. I wasn’t expecting to enjoy this book as much as I did, and was pleasantly surprised and suitably intrigued about the authors other works. First of all, it is a book about the relationship of a married couple, Nate and Chloe who met and fell in love in childhood. Secondly it is a book with a multi-layered plot entrenched in mystery and drama. Chloe is left dumbfounded when she finds a cryptic note from her husband, saying that he has gone back to their childhood town, as there is something he “must do.” The plot thickens when Chloe then finds a notebook written by Nate in a sort of code, hidden in one of their favourite childhood books – The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. As Chloe manages to decipher his writing and delve back into their past, their relationship is challenged and secrets are unearthed that no-one could have imagined.

This book was particularly enjoyable for me as it mentioned some classic and beloved adult and childrens literature that it was a pleasure to re-visit through this story. For example when Chloe first meets Nate and his family, she is introduced to C.S. Lewis and his wonderful world of Narnia, Chloe in turn introduces Nate to The Catcher In The Rye, and other timeless novels such as Robinson Crusoe and A Wrinkle in Time are noted and referred to. As with a lot of other books that I love, there is a darker side to this story, mainly involving Nate’s family and his ultra-religious, strict and disciplinary father. The author did a beautiful job of capturing the complexity of family relationships and through the use of flashbacks and memory episodes produced an intriguing mystery that every bibliophile will appreciate. I also have to admit that it was very effective in making me want to go back and visit The White Witch, Mr Tumnus and Aslan!  Unfortunately, I did figure out what was going on before the end of the book, but still highly recommend it and will look out for novels from this author in the future.

Would I recommend it?:

But of course!

Star rating (out of 5):

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