Stuart MacBride

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Book Tag – Shelfie by Shelfie #9

Published August 3, 2018 by bibliobeth

Image edited from: <a href=”http://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/frame”>Frame image created by Jannoon028 – Freepik.com</a>

Hi everyone and welcome to a brand new tag – Shelfie by Shelfie that I was inspired to create late one night when I couldn’t sleep. If you want to join in, you share a picture (or “shelfie”) of one of your shelves i.e. favourites, TBR, however you like to organise them, and then answer ten questions that are based around that particular shelf. I have quite a large collection and am going to do every single bookshelf which comprises both my huge TBR and the books I’ve read and kept but please, don’t feel obliged to do every shelf yourself if you fancy doing this tag. I’d love to see anything and just a snapshot of your collection would be terrific and I’m sure, really interesting for other people to see!

Here are the other Shelfies I’ve done: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  7 and 8

Anyway – on with the tag, here is the sixth shelf of my first bookshelf (I’ve chosen to split it up into two separate shelfies because of the sheer number of books, oops!). Here is the back shelf and we’re looking at the middle part of this image.

And here are the questions!:

1.) Is there any reason for this shelf being organised the way it is or is it purely random?

Like my last shelfie, this one kind of has some organisation. Kind of. I’ve got some authors grouped together like all my Persephone books (that’s the grey ones in the middle of the image there). I’ve also got all my Irvine Welsh books together, a couple of Stuart MacBride’s and a series by Ariana Franklin.

2.) Tell us a story about one of the books on this shelf that is special to you i.e. how you got it/ a memory associated with it etc.

I think I’m going to mention Irvine Welsh’s Porno. I had never read any Irvine Welsh before his most famous book, Trainspotting and Porno is the sequel to that. I think it was when I read Porno and probably Irvine’s book Filth, (which I think I’ve loaned to someone but I can’t think who – bookworm panic!!) that I realised I might not EVER be shocked by anything in a book ever again!

3.) Which book from this shelf would you ditch if you were forced to and why?

Difficult. I haven’t read many of the books on this shelf apart from a couple of Irvine Welsh’s but if I had to choose I’d have to go with the one I’m least excited about reading sadly, which would be Ghost by Robert Harris. I’ve read a couple of Harris books now and really enjoyed the last one I read, Conclave but am not super excited to pick this one up. I stand ready to be convinced though if anyone else has read and loved it?

4.) Which book from this shelf would you save in an emergency and why?

Can I cheat and say all of the Persephone books? They are a specialist bookshop in London literally minutes from where I’m working at the moment at Great Ormond Street and they publish mainly books from forgotten women authors. Their books have the classic sign of being grey and quite plain on the outside and on the inside they have very individual, beautiful endpapers and a matching bookmark. Like so –

5.) Which book has been on this shelf for the longest time?

I think that would be the series by Ariana Franklin that begins with Mistress Of The Art Of Death. Same old story, just haven’t got round to starting it yet!

6.) Which book is the newest addition to this shelf?

Newest addition would be Hot Milk by Deborah Levy. It was on a 3 for 2 offer in Waterstones near where I live and as I wanted to pick up another two books whilst I was there, it would be silly not to go for it. The bookseller really sold it to me as well and I’ve only heard good things.

7.) Which book from this shelf are you most excited to read (or re-read if this is a favourites shelf?)

I think I’m most excited to read Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler. It’s part of the Hogarth Shakespeare series and is Tyler’s modern re-telling of Shakespeare’s The Taming Of The Shrew. I love the cover and am intrigued to give it a shot.

8.) If there is an object on this shelf apart from books, tell us the story behind it.

There’s no room for any object on this shelf unfortunately, it’s double stacked as a lot of my shelves are!

9.) What does this shelf tell us about you as a reader?

Like other shelfies I think it says that I enjoy a variety of genres like thrillers, historical and literary fiction and also have an appreciation for beautiful books like the Persephone collection!

10.) Choose other bloggers to tag or choose a free question you make up yourself.

I won’t tag anyone but if anyone wants to do this tag, I’d be delighted and I’d love to see your shelfie.

For other Shelfie by Shelfies round the blogosphere, please see:

Chrissi @ Chrissi Reads FAVOURITES shelfie HERE and her Shelfie by Shelfie 2 HERE.

Sarah @ The Aroma Of Books Shelfie 1A, 1B, 1C 1D and 1E

Dee @ Dees Rad Reads And Reviews Shelfie HERE

Jacquie @ Rattle The Stars Shelfie HERE

Stuart @ Always Trust In Books Shelfie #1 HERE.

Jennifer @ Tar Heel Reader Shelfie #1 HERE

Thank you so much to Chrissi, Sarah, Dee, Jacquie, Stuart and Jennifer for participating in Shelfie by Shelfie, it really means the world to me. Hugs!

If you’ve done this tag, please let me know and I’d be happy to add you to Shelfie by Shelfies round the blogosphere!

COMING SOON on bibliobeth : Shelfie by Shelfie #10

Flesh House – Stuart MacBride

Published July 22, 2013 by bibliobeth

Flesh House (Logan McRae, #4)

What’s it all about?:

The city is in a state of fear. Some 20 years ago, the Grampian police nailed a particularly vicious serial killer known as The Flesher, a monster who had claimed victims throughout the country. But one of those frequent legal appeals which so often release dangerous criminals into the community has freed him, and when a container with human body parts appears at Aberdeen harbour, it looks like the stage is once again set for carnage on a massive scale. DS Logan McRae (along with his less experienced colleague, Chief Constable Mark Faulds from Birmingham — who was on the original team tracking down The Flesher), finds himself in charge of one of the most ambitious manhunts city has ever seen. And then members of the original team tracking down their serial killer prey (whose real name is Ken Wiseman) begin to disappear — and more human meat is making grisly appearances. All of this is delivered with the requisite grasp of tension and characterisation that we have come to expect from Stuart MacBride.

What did I think?:

This is the fourth book in the Logan McRae series, and has to be my favourite one so far. Twenty years ago, a serial killer known as The Flesher, terrorized Scotland by dismembering his victims and eating them. A man called Ken Wiseman was fingered for the murky deeds but escaped jail time on a technicality which has always infuriated Logan’s boss, Insch who played a major part in his conviction and trial. Fast forward to the present day where butchered human remains are found in food about to be sent to an oil rig, even more in the supplier’s freezers and considerably more in an abattoir – along with some grisly parts like hair and teeth which leave the police force in no doubt that the cannibalistic killer has returned and may be attempting to get some human bits and pieces into the food chain.

The obvious perp for the crime is Ken Wiseman and the fact that he has done a runner doesn’t exactly look good for him, but as with MacBride’s other work, the real story is considerably more complicated. And it is a work of pure genius. The plot kept me gripped throughout, to the extent where it got incredibly frustrating as I just wanted to know what was going on! Character wise, I felt Logan was pretty much put on the back burner in this novel, but don’t think this was necessarily a bad thing as the plot was so convoluted in its structure that digging further into the mind of Logan McRae may have over-egged things slightly.

I also enjoyed exploring a different side of Insch – the notorious jelly baby muncher/Logan’s superior, and the hilarious chain-smoking Steel.  Also characteristic of these novels is MacBride’s hard and gritty sense of humour which I always appreciate, especially when delivered in the textbook Scottish self-deprecating style. Is it wrong to say that I found the word “jobbie,” strangely comforting as a Scot living in England?! Other things that made this book quite special was the addition of newspaper articles interspersed between some chapters with images that the author claims are family and friends he roped into posing for him (although I don’t know who drew the short straw to play The Flesher). I really don’t want to say too much about the ending, but it’s an absolute blinder and one I won’t forget in a hurry. If you haven’t read any Stuart MacBride before (do it!), this is a brilliant introduction to his work, and can be read as a stand alone or as part of the series. I’m hoping you all get a good laugh out of Steel’s Kermit the Frog joke also, it might be a bit rude to repeat here…

Would I recommend it?:

But of course!

Star rating (out of 5):

four-stars_0