Rudyard Kipling

All posts tagged Rudyard Kipling

Beth And Chrissi Do Kid-Lit – The Titles For 2019 Revealed!

Published January 2, 2019 by bibliobeth

Hello everyone and welcome to the reveal for myself and Chrissi Reads Kid-Lit challenge for 2019. We’re very excited for our list this year and think we’ve picked some wonderful titles, a mixture of old favourites, authors we’ve read before but are keen to read more of and new-to-us authors/reads. Without further ado, here’s what we’ll be reading this year. Join us at the end of January for our first post!

JANUARY – Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret- Judy Blume

FEBRUARY- The BFG -Roald Dahl

MARCH – The Titan’s Curse (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #3)- Rick Riordan

APRIL- Demon Dentist- David Walliams

MAY – The Enchanted Wood (The Faraway Tree #1)- Enid Blyton

JUNE- What Katy Did- Susan Coolidge

JULY – The Dreamsnatcher (Dreamsnatcher #1) Abi Elphinstone

AUGUST- The Royal Rabbits of London- Santa Montefiore and Simon Sebag Montefiore

SEPTEMBER – I Capture The Castle- Dodie Smith

OCTOBER- Just So- Rudyard Kipling

NOVEMBER – The Worst Witch- Jill Murphy

DECEMBER- The Christmasaurus- Tom Fletcher

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Short Stories Challenge – The Cat That Walked By Himself by Rudyard Kipling from the collection Stories To Get You Through The Night

Published October 24, 2015 by bibliobeth

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What’s The Cat That Walked By Himself all about?:

This is a short story about the beginning of domesticated life and in Kipling’s inimitable style we see a host of animals become the servant or friend of first Man.

What did I think?:

This story was first published as part of Kipling’s Just So stories in 1902 which I was sure that I had read but couldn’t remember this one at all! The writing has a magical quality and the story is so endearing that I can easily imagine reading it to children. The tale begins as first Man and first Women meet and start building a life together in a cave, even making a first Baby. Meanwhile, in the forest, the wild animals are looking on in interest, all apart from the proud Cat that is. He is determined that he is not put out in the slightest, after all:

“He walked by himself, and all places were alike to him.”

One night, the Woman creates the First Singing Magic with a shoulder blade of bone as the wild animals look on, entranced by the fire but not entirely certain what it all means. The Dog, led by his nose and thinking the smells from the cave quite wonderful approaches the woman and asks her what she is doing to be creating all these amazing smells. The Woman makes a deal with the Dog. If he will go out hunting with the Man and guard the cave at night he can have as many of the good smelling bones that he likes. Thinking that sounded like a pretty sweet deal, the Dog agrees and he becomes known as the First Friend of Man. The Cat is indifferent however and scoffs:

“This is a very wise Woman, but not as wise as me.”

The next day the Woman cuts long armfuls of fresh, green grass and once again, by the fire, makes a Second Singing Magic. This is very appealing to the Horse and he decides he wants to go to the Woman, beseeching the Cat to come with him. However the arrogant Cat only replies:

“I am the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to me. I will not come.”

The Woman again offers an exchange to the Horse and manages to get a leash over his neck in return for fresh green grass three times a day. In this way, the Horse becomes the first Servant of Man and helps him in his hunting. The pattern repeats itself again when the Cow promises to give her milk to the Woman each day in return for grass although the Cat has been following his companions and his curiosity gets the better of him. He asks the Woman where his friends are and the Woman says that she has no more need for friends or servants so he should return to the Wild, especially as he is the Cat who walks by himself. The Cat is petulant and doesn’t see why he shouldn’t be allowed in the cave to sit by the warm fire and try the milk. So the Woman makes a deal with him. She tells him if she should speak one word in his praise he may come into the cave, two words and he may sit by the fire and three words, that he will be allowed to drink the milk three times a day forever.

The Cat has to use all the craftiness in his character to trick the woman into praising him on three separate occasions, but he manages it admirably. He is able to enter the cave, sit by the fire and drink milk. However, he hadn’t bargained for his three friends Dog, Horse and Cow to turn the tables on him so perhaps he isn’t the cleverest cat in the world, after all!

This was a lovely, lovely story that I’m so glad I found. It’s written in a sort of fairy-tale style, which is why I think it would be so appealing to children but I think there’s many things there adults would appreciate also. For example, I had to laugh when Kipling tells us that First Man used to be very wild too, that is, until he met First Woman and she tamed the wildness out of him! It’s also a marvellous tale of the characters of animals – the sensitivity of dogs noses, the speed and swiftness of the horse and of course, the independence of the cat. I’m not really a cat lover myself, I’ve had a particularly bad experience personally with them and I’m much more a dog person which is why I did have a little chuckle when Cat got his comeuppance at the end of the story. Great fun and beautifully written this is a treat however for all animal lovers.

Would I recommend it?:

But of course!

Star rating (out of 5):

four-stars_0

NEXT SHORT STORY: The Wedding Gig by Stephen King from the collection Skeleton Crew

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Short Stories Challenge 2015 – July to September

Published July 1, 2015 by bibliobeth

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Welcome to another three months of short stories! This little lot should see me through into the autumn.

Week beginning 6th July

Small Degrees by Kevin Brockmeier from the collection Things That Fall From The Sky

Week beginning 13th July

Airshow by Jon McGregor from the collection This Isn’t The Sort of Thing That Happens To Someone Like You

Week beginning 20th July

The Menace by Daphne du Maurier from the collection The Breaking Point

Week beginning 27th July

Candia by Graham Joyce from the collection Tales For A Dark Evening

Week beginning 3rd August

Medicine by Michel Faber from the collection The

Apple: New Crimson Petal Stories

Week beginning 10th August

Necessary Women by Karin Slaughter (stand-alone)

Week beginning 17th August

The Mistletoe Bride by Kate Mosse from the collection The Mistletoe Bride and Other Haunting Tales

Week beginning 24th August

Tell Me I’ll See You Again by Dennis Etchison from the collection A Book of Horrors

Week beginning 31st August

The Whisperer in Darkness by H.P. Lovecraft from the collection The Definitive H.P. Lovecraft

Week beginning 7th September

The Rat In The Attic by Brian McGilloway from the collection The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 7

Week beginning 14th September

Care by Julie Orringer from the collection How To Breathe Underwater

Week beginning 21st September

The Cat That Walked By Himself by Rudyard Kipling from the collection Stories To Get You Through The Night

Week beginning 28th September

The Wedding Gig by Stephen King from the collection Skeleton Crew