Mark Robertson

All posts tagged Mark Robertson

Mini Pin-It Reviews #1 – Four Author Requests

Published August 20, 2016 by bibliobeth

image

Hello everyone and welcome to a new feature on my blog! Due to problems with a chronic illness (which I hope to explain to you in a personal post soon) I am hugely behind with my reviews.. yes I actually have a backlog of just over a YEAR in reviews and, I have to be honest, it’s been stressing me out with the thought of never being able to catch up. Then my lovely sister and fellow blogger Chrissi Reads, who does something similar on her blog, gave me the fantastic idea of doing short and snappy reviews on a post-it. I just want to stress that it doesn’t mean that I didn’t enjoy the book – it’s just a good way for me for getting something out there a bit quicker for all the wonderful authors that send me books to review and for books I’ve had from NetGalley and Book Bridgr that, although read, are just languishing on the review pile!

For this first post, I’ve chosen four books that I’ve been sent directly from authors (or their publisher) that I’ll still be giving a star rating/recommendation to at the end. Hope you enjoy!

1.) Getting Rooted In New Zealand by Jamie Baywood

17863572

What’s it all about?:

Craving change and lacking logic, at 26, Jamie, a cute and quirky Californian, impulsively moves to New Zealand to avoid dating after reading that the country’s population has 100,000 fewer men. In her journal, she captures a hysterically honest look at herself, her past and her new wonderfully weird world filled with curious characters and slapstick situations in unbelievably bizarre jobs. It takes a zany jaunt to the end of the Earth and a serendipitous meeting with a fellow traveler before Jamie learns what it really means to get rooted.

image (2)

Would I recommend it?:

Probably!

Star rating (out of 5):

3 Star Rating Clip Art

2.) Off Key by Mark Robertson

21946757

What’s it all about?:

Charlotte has supported Kyle’s precarious musical career for three years. Now it’s her turn. When Kyle doesn’t want to play the breadwinner, she looks to a future on the other side of the Atlantic. Saxophonist Kyle has no money, no career and has now lost the love of his live. Can an autistic twelve-year-old boy and an alcoholic ‘has been’ be his salvation?

image (4)

Would I recommend it?:

Probably!

Star rating (out of 5):

3 Star Rating Clip Art

3.) Piano From A 4th Storey Window – Jenny Morton Potts

23465591

What’s it all about?:

Lawrence Fyre and Marin Strang aren’t like other people.

He is the eccentric owner of failing Sargasso Books in the Brighton Lanes. She is an ex-Jehovah’s Witness and isolated Spanish teacher. If they live together in his illegal, beautiful, rope laddered lock-up, can their love overcome their losses?

Original, sexy, very funny and deeply moving. An author in complete control of a number of unforgettable characters and emotional highs and lows, Jenny Morton Potts leaves the reader breathless, and wanting more.

image (5)

Would I recommend it?:

But of course!

Star rating (out of 5):

four-stars_0

4.) The Death Of Danny Daggers – Haydn Wilks

25466648

What’s it all about?:

Cardiff. The last few days of summer.
Danny Daggers is about to die. He just doesn’t realise it yet.
A Leeds University student with a very popular YouTube channel, Danny Daggers is taking his alcohol-downing stunts on tour.
He’s about to find out that not everyone’s a fan.

Ji Eun is a Korean student doing work experience at the South Wales Post.
Rory Gallagher is the alcoholic veteran journo who’s mentoring her.
Carnage in Cardiff might be just what they need to begin and revive their respective careers.

Tom and Joseph work at one of Cardiff’s many call centres.
Tom is fed up of working boring jobs and living for the weekend.
Joseph is just happy to have a job.

Then there’s the Amstell brothers.
Simon’s just escaped from prison. And he happens to be the father of Joseph’s girlfriend’s son.
And his brothers happen to be psychopaths.

These stories collide and intersect over a frantic few days of heavy drinking, drugs and ultraviolence, set against a backdrop of dystopian modern Britain.

image (6)

Would I recommend it?:

Probably!

Star rating (out of 5):

3 Star Rating Clip Art

COMING UP SOON ON MY PIN-IT REVIEWS: Four Book Bridgr Reviews.

 

April 2015 – Book Bridgr/NetGalley/Kindle/ARC Month

Published April 1, 2015 by bibliobeth

kindle

It’s that time again. One whole month devoted to catching up with some review copies, books I’ve received from Book Bridgr and NetGalley and those poor forgotten books on my Kindle that I’ve been meaning to get around to. Here’s what I’ll be reading this April (linked to GoodReads and then my review once written):

Strange Girls And Ordinary Women – Morgan McCarthy

(courtesy of BookBridgr)

Noah’s Rainy Day – Sandra Brannan

(courtesy of NetGalley)

The Girl On The Train – Paula Hawkins

(bought for Kindle)

Getting Rooted In New Zealand – Jamie Baywood

(from author)

This Is The Water – Yannick Murphy

(courtesy of BookBridgr)

Divinity And The Python – Bonnie Randall

(courtesy of NetGalley)

The Love Song Of Miss Queenie Hennessy – Rachel Joyce

(borrowed from Chrissi Reads for Kindle)

Off Key – Mark Robertson

(from author)

Roseblood – Paul Doherty

(courtesy of BookBridgr)

Piano From A 4th Storey Window – Jenny Morton Potts

(from author)

There’s a lot of goodies on this list I’m looking forward to. I’m really excited about The Girl On The Train and Queenie Hennessy (as The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry is one of my all time favourite books). Bring it on April, I’m ready for you!