Foyles Charing Cross Road

All posts tagged Foyles Charing Cross Road

Confessions of Two Bibliophiles #3

Published October 1, 2013 by bibliobeth

download

CHAPTER THREE: OLD VERSUS NEW?

Beth,

I had such a great time at Foyles with you. I think we could’ve spent more hours in there. We’ll have to go again soon for sure. I just love the book shopping experience. But I have to admit, they have to be new books.

I don’t know why I have such a problem with second hand books. I think it could be something to do with not knowing where it’s been, or receiving a second hand book that has been really battered, its spine broken and stains all over it. Yuck!  I don’t mind borrowing books off people that I know have treated their books well (like you or Luna), so it’s not exactly because I’m a book snob who only likes their hands to have touched a book.

What do you think of second hand books?

Chrissi x

Chrissi,

I had such a great time at Foyles too! I think it has to be one of my favourite bookshops around (on Charing Cross Rd, London). The mere size of it filled with all those lovely books is a sight to send a bibliophile like me weak at the knees. There’s also nothing like buying a brand new book, no marks, no dog-eared pages, and don’t get me started about the smell when you crack it open. I think this probably ties in with our first conversation about bending the spines on books and how slightly obsessive we are about keeping the spines intact?
As for second-hand books, I’m probably slightly more easy-going about it. I do enjoy going into second-hand bookshops where the books are just clumped everywhere and you’re never sure what you’re going to find. Plus, you do get some pretty good bargains, and may get a book you like much cheaper than you would if it was brand new. For me though, if I’m not terribly bothered about the author, I might buy a copy of their book second-hand as it works out cheaper. On the other hand, for my favourite authors, the books just HAVE to be new.
Beth x
Beth,

I think the only problem with Foyles is that we’re going to want to revisit it every time we’re in the area.. Oops! I actually noticed a lot of second hand bookshops surrounding it, which I’d usually just dismiss. You’re right though, they are usually a hell of a lot cheaper, so I should at least give them more of a try.  Hopefully I wouldn’t pick up a book that I found interesting that it’s previous owner abused!

Chrissi x

So what does everyone think of second hand books? A great bargain to be had, or can you not resist the lure of a brand spanking new version? Please share your thoughts, we’d love to hear them.

Confessions of Two Bibliophiles #2

Published August 25, 2013 by bibliobeth

download (7)

CHAPTER TWO: THE E-READER vs THE ORIGINAL BOOK

 

Chrissi,
 
There’s been a lot of talk about which is better, the e-reader or the original “tree” book, and I know we have a lot to say about this! First of all I must hang my head in shame, as pre-Kindle, I was so vehemently opposed to e-readers, I swore I would never have one and would (puts hand on heart) stay loyal to the paper book. Well, that didn’t last very long! Now I have my Kindle, I love it to bits, and can’t remember how I coped without it. Its easy to read on and so convenient – I have quite a long commute to work and it’s been my life saver on the tube as I squeeze myself into precarious positions amongst the other Londoners, which I have to say, is much easier with a Kindle than a bulky hard/paperback book. Also, going on holiday! I devour books at quite a pace, and the memory of over-loading my suitcase with books (probably books rather than clothes…) is a thing of the past! Hundreds of books come right with me, no questions asked.
 
This isn’t to say I don’t love real books. Of course I do! And my bulging bookshelves at home agree with me. I will never stop buying them as I love the smell and touch and they look so beautiful in their righteous hard copy self. I will usually always buy an especially brilliant real book even if I have it already on Kindle, just for the joy of having it in its real form.
 
What do you think?
 
Beth

Beth,

Ah, this topic. There are so many pros and cons to both! I think you’re more of a fan of the Kindle than me, even though I am slowly coming around to the idea.

The kindle definitely makes my life as a book blogger easier, and I have to admit, it’s much easier to take out with me rather than lug around books. It’s easy for commuting and I can read a Kindle on a coach, but I can’t read a real book in a coach. What’s that about? I also use my kindle for ARCs from NetGalley, so that’s a bonus.

However, the Kindle just isn’t a book. It may be cheaper than physical books, but you can’t beat going into a bookshop and buying a beautiful smelling, perfect condition book. I’m obsessed with smelling a physical book. They just smell SO good. I want to bottle that smell. Oh I do. (Now I sound weird, but I’m sure fellow bibliophiles know exactly what I mean!) I also love browsing in bookshops and it’s just not the same with Kindle shopping.

It’s the same for me with buying books on Amazon. I love their Kindle sales, but nothing beats getting an Amazon package, opening it and just admiring all of your pretties.

Do you think the e-book will eventually take over the physical book? That thought terrifies me.

Chrissi

Chrissi,

Yes, I think I am a bit more of a Kindle fan than you! Although since you’ve discovered the joy of Net Galley, I think you are appreciating the little beast a bit more? I’m not sure why you can read a Kindle on a coach but not a book, I haven’t tried myself, I’m too scared I’ll get travel sick, but maybe it’s to do with not having to manually turn pages and your eye movements? Who knows!
But yes, I do agree with you that the Kindle can’t ever beat a real book – maybe this is why I think (in answer to your last question) that the e-book will never replace the real book. You can’t beat a bookstore, even if you don’t have the money to buy anything, just browsing is enough to get me excited! Plus, they just look so gooooooood. At the moment, we just buy an e-book by clicking a button, which doesn’t give me nearly the same feeling as walking out of a shop with a bag full of books and a smug grin on my face. Although, I am slightly worried I’ve developed Kindle 1-click itis…. it’s just to easy to keep hitting that button don’t you think?
 
Beth
Beth,
Yes it’s far too easy to click that Kindle 1-click button. Sometimes the Kindle books are just SO much cheaper as well. Perhaps real books need to become a bit cheaper? But then I guess someone is losing out in some way. Hmm.

Something I always do is buy a ‘real’ copy of my favourite authors books. You can’t beat having them all lined up on your shelf. They just look SO good.

It’s certainly a tough one but I for one know that the e-book will never, ever, ever replace my real book.  I can’t wait until we go to Foyles on Charing Cross Road and I can see you revel in the book glory. There’s NOTHING like a good bookstore as you say. I just wonder how many books we’ll pick up and add to our already bulging TBR piles both with real books and kindle books…

Chrissi

So what does everyone else think? Please feel free to join in our conversation, we’d love to hear your opinions!