Banned Books 2018 – SEPTEMBER READ – Taming The Star Runner by S.E. Hinton

Published September 24, 2018 by bibliobeth

What’s it all about?:

Travis is the epitome of cool, even when he’s in trouble. But when he’s sent to stay with his uncle on a ranch in the country, he finds that his schoolmates don’t like his tough city ways. He does find friendship of a sort with Casey, who runs a riding school at the ranch. She’s the bravest person Travis has ever met, and crazy enough to try to tame the Star Runner, her beautiful, dangerous horse who’s always on edge, about to explode. It’s clear to Travis that he and the Star Runner are two of a kind: creatures not meant to be tamed.

Logo designed by Luna’s Little Library

Welcome to the ninth banned book in our series for 2018! As always, we’ll be looking at why the book was challenged, how/if things have changed since the book was originally published and our own opinions on the book. Here’s what we’ll be reading for the rest of the year:

OCTOBER: Beloved -Toni Morrison
NOVEMBER: King & King -Linda de Haan
DECEMBER: Flashcards Of My Life– Charise Mericle Harper
For now, back to this month:

Taming The Star Runner by S.E. Hinton

First published: 1988

In the Top Ten most frequently challenged books in 2002 (source)

Reasons: offensive language

Do you understand or agree with any of the reasons for the book being challenged when it was originally published?

BETH:  As one of the older releases on our list this year, you might hope that opinions and prejudices about certain things in books diminish as we become more enlightened as a society. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. I think there are always going to be a group of individuals that are easily offended, over-protective of children’s sensitivities or sometimes, they just want something to complain about. There could be valid reasons for monitoring children’s reading, within reason, if they may be reading something a bit too adult for them and this is a decision parents and librarians can make but challenging/banning books for a silly reason? I don’t agree with that at all. Back in 1988, our use of profanity wasn’t that different from what it is right now so I don’t think the reason for challenging this book was the right one either back then or now.

CHRISSI: I really don’t understand the reasons why this book is banned. Offensive language? Hm. Yes, there is some bad language in the story, but nothing worse than children might hear on TV, from peers or even from parents. It wasn’t as if this book was written in a time where bad language wasn’t used as frequently as now. I actually thought it might have been the drug mention that tipped this one into a banned/challenged book, but I was wrong.

How about now?

BETH: The reasons for challenging/banning a book ALWAYS manage to surprise me and that’s one of the reasons why I don’t look at the reason until I’m writing this review so that I can try and guess what might be so offensive myself. In Taming The Star Runner, I thought – “Okay, they might have a problem with underage teenage drinking, the smoking and the incidence of violence in the novel.” Then I went to the website (link above) so certain I was right and saw one reason only – offensive language. I just can’t call this anymore, it’s far too unpredictable! As the book was challenged in 2002, which feels relatively recently in my eyes it’s obvious some people will pick on anything and have issues with the smallest things. I don’t remember any incidents of offensive language in this novel but if there was, I feel like it was very minor? Furthermore, I think this is a book aimed at the young adult market who would probably be hearing a lot worse language in everyday life than what they read in this book!

CHRISSI: I have to agree with Beth, there are far worse incidences of language in everyday life than in this book. It’s actually a bit of a joke for me, to know that this is challenged due to its language. Really?! Children/young adults here much worse than what was in this book. *sigh* I feel like most of the books that we read have ridiculous reasons for banning a book. I feel like we need to be more open minded and accepting that children/young adults are exposed to much worse things than in some of these challenged choices.

What did you think of this book?:

BETH: I enjoyed it for the most part. I thought it was an engaging story with an interesting male lead who was so broken at the start of the narrative that I was constantly compelled to read on, invested in his journey to become a writer and deal with his personal issues. I have to admit, I didn’t like the “horsey” bits as much but I think this is a personal preference, I’m not really a “horsey” girl. I feel like the story would have been just as good without the inclusion of Star Runner but I do understand why he was there, as the animal representation of Travis.

CHRISSI: I enjoyed this book much more than I thought I would. It didn’t take me long to read at all and I was interested enough in the story to keep turning the pages. Again, like Beth, I wasn’t keen on the horse elements of this story. I’m not a horse fan.

Would you recommend it?:

BETH: Probably!

CHRISSI: Yes!

BETH’s personal star rating (out of 5):

3-5-stars

Coming up on the last Monday of October, we review Beloved by Toni Morrison.

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11 comments on “Banned Books 2018 – SEPTEMBER READ – Taming The Star Runner by S.E. Hinton

  • Offensive language is such a ridiculous reason for banning a book! You can’t shelter children from that forever. You can hear “offensive” language just walking through the park, not to mention what kids say among themselves. What a dumb reason. That just irks me so much.

    All that said, I’m almost positive I read this as a kid and remember nothing of it…but like you I’m not a “horsey” girl and could never get much out of those stories. Great post + look at this topic!

  • I love, love, and love reading books that are banned for a reason or for another. It means those books are the books a person must read. Not really a fan of offensive language in real life on in books, but kids these days are exposed to all types of ” no, no!”
    I wonder when people will understand that what’s dangerous is not what’s written in a book, but what’s purposely kept as taboo.

      • Yes, I agree with you. For example, I still don’t understand why here in the U.S. there is a big taboo about nude figures in art. In Europe art is art and children walk among monuments and paintings with no issues. Here, I have to discuss a painting with parents or cover the painting with a black dot before using it in my lesson plan. I do respect opinions and beliefs different from mine, but sometimes, those beliefs seem to create unnecessary fears and taboos.

      • Yes, I don’t really understand that – it’s art, it shouldn’t be offensive to people! Aren’t we also teaching children nudity and their bodies is something to be ashamed of if teachers have to teach like this? 🤔

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